2020-03-31 02:03:43 57041420 Monsey Hanukkah attack victim succumbs to wounds Josef Neumann, 72-year-old father, grandfather and great-grandfather, died Sunday night, says Orthodox Jewish Public Affairs Council; funeral set for Monday Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-57041420,00.html Mon, 30 Mar 2020 13:49:56 +03:00 A man who was among the five people stabbed during a Hanukkah celebration north of New York City has died three months after the attack, according to an Orthodox Jewish organization and community liaison with a local police department. Josef Neumann, 72, died Sunday night, the Orthodox Jewish Public Affairs Council said in a tweet. The funeral for Neumann, a father of seven and great-grandfather, will be held Monday. No additional details were provided. On Dec. 28, an attacker with a machete rushed into a rabbi's home in an Orthodox Jewish community in Monsey, New York, an ambush Gov. Andrew Cuomo called an act of domestic terrorism fueled by intolerance and a "cancer" of growing hatred in America. Rabbi Yisroel Kahan, who is the community liaison for the Ramapo Police Department that serves Monsey and executive director of Oizrim Jewish Council, shared the news of Neumann's passing on his Twitter account as well. "We were hoping when he started to open his eyes," Rabbi Yisroel Kahan told The Journal News on Sunday night. "We were hoping and praying he would then pull through. This is so very sad he was killed celebrating Hanukkah with friends just because he was a Jew." In the days following the attack, Neumann's family said in a statement that the knife penetrated his skull and went directly into his brain, which could have caused permanent brain damage and could leave him partially paralyzed. He also suffered other cuts to the head and neck, and his arm was shattered. The Hanukkah attack came amid a string of violence that has alarmed Jews in the region. Federal prosecutors said the man charged in the attack, Grafton Thomas, had handwritten journals containing anti-Semitic comments and a swastika and had researched Adolf Hitler's hatred of Jews online. Thomas' lawyer and relatives said he has struggled for years with mental illness; they said he was raised in a tolerant home and hadn't previously shown any animosity toward Jewish people. Thomas was indictnbsp; <IMG id=captionImageElement6274309> </p><p>The Hanukkah attack came amid a string of violence that has alarmed Jews in the region.</p> <p>Federal prosecutors said the man charged in the attack, Grafton Thomas, had handwritten journals containing anti-Semitic comments and a swastika and had researched Adolf Hitler's hatred of Jews online.&nbsp;</p> <p>Thomas' lawyer and relatives said he has struggled for years with mental illness; they said he was raised in a tolerant home and hadn't previously shown any animosity toward Jewish people.</p> <p>Thomas was indicted on federal hate crime charges as well as state charges, including attempted murder. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.</p> <p><br></p> message 57040840 Jews the world over among hardest hit by coronavirus The tendency of Jews to congregate in large groups, crowded houses of worship and a resistance to comply with authorities' directives contributes to the alarming numbers of coronavirus cases and fatalities as a result Ynet https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-57040840,00.html Mon, 30 Mar 2020 11:53:9 +03:00 Ultra-Orthodox communities in New York are reporting a catastrophe. Due to the makeup of these communities that are fragmented into different congregations, it is difficult to confirm the real number of fatalities as a result of coronavirus, but it is believed to be high. Haredi WhatsApp groups reported six people had died over Shabbat including a 42-year-old man from Boro Park. Video of him dancing at a Purim celebration just three weeks ago was released. A 39-year-old bus driver has also died, and the local press is reporting that many members of these communities are seriously ill with the virus. At least 17 funerals were conducted Friday for the Hassidic community at Boro Park, six times the normal number. Local Chevra Kadisha reached out for help saying: "We are flooded and are in need of drivers and cars." The Jewish communities in New York, that are at the center of the outbreak, are reporting thousands of cases of coronavirus among their members. Almost every Haredi home has at least one family member sick with the virus with community celebrations and crowded synagogues seen as accelerators of the spread. The virus was first detected in a New Rochelle synagogue north of Manhattan with a surge in cases now reported in Boro Park and Williamsburg in Brooklyn. Orthodox Jews make up 13% of all confirmed cases in New York, as of last week with authorities attempting to enforce strict quarantine-at-home restrictions after New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the closure of all synagogues, but the more extreme groups are still refusing to comply. Los Angeles is also experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases. Enforcement of restrictions there are also ineffective among the ultra-Orthodox. Most congregations did close their synagogues, and many began conducting services online, but Edat Yeshorun, in North Hollywood persisted in keeping their doors open and only after rumors appeared about nine confirmed cases among worshipers did authorities move to cloe closure of all synagogues, but the more extreme groups are still refusing to comply.&nbsp;</p> <p>Los Angeles is also experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases. Enforcement of restrictions there are also ineffective among the ultra-Orthodox.</p> <p>Most congregations did close their synagogues, and many began conducting services online, but Edat Yeshorun, in North Hollywood persisted in keeping their doors open and only after rumors appeared about nine confirmed cases among worshipers did authorities move to close the place down. The local rabbi denied there were any coronavirus cases among his flock.</p> <p>Not only orthodox Jews are in danger of contracting the virus. Jews are the minority most entrenched in American society and are therefore more likely to be in intimate contact with those infected.</p> <p>Jews are also seen to be prone to gather in family clusters, further increasing the risk of infection.</p> <p>Jewish communities have begun laying their staff off because of the economic ramifications of the pandemic fueling fears that many of America's Jews will lose their health insurance.</p> <p>In France, the Orthodox Jewish community is also suffering great losses including senior religious figures who have died from coronavirus.</p> <P>&nbsp; <IMG id=captionImageElement6277155> </p><p>The fatalities constitute a much larger percentage of all cases than their size in the general population. Head of the Jewish congregations in France, Robert Ejnes said all synagogues and community centers have now been closed to contain the spread as members are urged to remain homebound.</p> <p>In the hardest-hit community of Strasburg, the majority of its members are already reported to have become ill.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the UK the numbers are also surpassing Jews presence in the general population though ultra-Orthodox communities persist in ignoring government restrictions.</p> <p>A reported 5% of all fatalities in the U.K. are Jews, though they constitute only 0.3% of message 57015980 Rabbis approve online Seder to include isolated elderly family members Ruling comes out of concern for emotional state of elderly people who have been cut off from families outside world; call app must be turned on before holiday begins Kobi Nachshoni https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-57015980,00.html Wed, 25 Mar 2020 18:55:54 +03:00 Several community and city rabbis have signed a decree on Wednesday allowing the use of online applications to share the Seder dinner on Passover with quarantined and isolated family members. The decree allows many of the congregations' elderly members who are isolated from their family because of the coronavirus pandemic to celebrate the holiday with their families, if only in a virtual manner. The groundbreaking ruling was made for a congregation of predominately of Moroccan origin and after a philanthropist inquired about the use of a computer during the Passover week as he was planning to donate some for elderly people who are now isolated from their families. The ruling is conditioned on the app being turned on before sundown when the holiday begins and comes with a strict warning that the decree is valid for the current emergency and should not be mistaken as a free pass for any other time. The rabbis wrote in their ruling that they are concerned about the emotional well-being of elder people who have been cut off from the outside world. "We hope to ensure they have a will to live and fight off disease," they said. The ruling raised objections from other religious leaders who said that the use of the technology should only be reserved for life-threatening situations. message 57010040 Haredi Jews in NY accused of 'spreading the virus' Amid the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S., the ultra-Orthodox community finds itself at the tail end of anti-Semitic verbal attacks; one video shows a car dealership employee verbally abusing a 'virus spreading' ultra-Orthodox customer Itamar Eichner, Amir Bogan https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-57010040,00.html Tue, 24 Mar 2020 20:53:52 +03:00 The coronavirus crisis in the United States has started to affect the local Jewish community that finds itself on the tail end of anti-Semitic attacks. A newly-emerged video shows an ultra-Orthodox Jew being refused service at a car dealership in New York due to the Jewish community "spreading" the disease. The video, posted by the StopAntisemites organization, shows an employee at a Toyota dealership in the upstate town of Goshen telling the Haredi customer to leave because the "Jews spread the virus." "I have an appointment, why do you not accept me? I just want to understand why all the guys can have service and you won't accept me," the Jewish man is heard in the video telling the mechanic. New York health officials expressed growing alarm that the coronavirus is spreading quickly in tightly knit Hasidic Jewish communities in Brooklyn, saying that they are investigating a spike in confirmed cases. More than 100 people have recently tested positive for the coronavirus in Borough Park and Williamsburg, two Brooklyn neighborhoods with sizable Hasidic Jewish populations - all of them tested at two urgent care centers that have been crowded with anxious patients, according to an urgent care center employee. The video is a sign of a frighteningly growing trend in the U.S. of people linking the COVID-19 epidemic to Jews. According to an ABC News report, racist extremist groups, including neo-Nazis and other white supremacists, are encouraging members who contract novel coronavirus disease to spread the contagion to cops and Jews, according to intelligence gathered by the FBI. In an alert obtained by ABC News, the FBI’s New York office reports that "members of extremist groups are encouraging one another to spread the virus, if contracted, through bodily fluids and personal interactions." "Anti-government folks in America love to target law enforcement as a symbol of America’s authority," said Don Mihalek, the executive vice president of the Federal Law Enforche contagion to cops and Jews, according to intelligence gathered by the FBI.</p> <p>In an alert obtained by ABC News, the FBI’s New York office reports that "members of extremist groups are encouraging one another to spread the virus, if contracted, through bodily fluids and personal interactions."</p> <DIV id=tvElement1874549></DIV><p>"Anti-government folks in America love to target law enforcement as a symbol of America’s authority," said Don Mihalek, the executive vice president of the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association Foundation and an ABC News contributor. "It’s just sad that's their focus at a time of crisis in the nation."</p> <p>Organizations that monitor the internet for white supremacist activity have reported to witnessing conversations that blame Jews and Jewish leaders for both the coronavirus and the global response, including the shutdown of all but essential government functions in places like New York, New Jersey and California.</p> <p>"From pushing the idea that Jews created the coronavirus virus to sell vaccines to encouraging infected followers to try to spread the illness to the Jewish community and law enforcement, as the coronavirus has spread, we have observed how white-supremacists, neo-Nazis and others have used this to drive their own conspiracy theories, spread disinformation and incite violence on their online platforms," said Michael Masters, the head of Secure Communities Network, an umbrella group that coordinates security for Jewish organizations and synagogues around the country.</p> <p><br></p> message 56987590 Coronavirus Shabbat: No synagogues, no services From Marrakesh to Manchester, Jewish world begins first sabbath without communal gatherings as rabbis across the globe urge cooperation with countries' guidelines and restrictions used in fight against deadly virus Itamar Eichner https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56987590,00.html Fri, 20 Mar 2020 19:49:13 +03:00 The Jewish world was embarking on an unprecedented situation on Friday: Shabbat without services, friends and family as rabbis across the globe ordered their communities' synagogues closed due to the continued spread of the coronavirus. On Tuesday, British Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis ordered the closure of all the nation's synagogues. “These extraordinary times call upon us to take extraordinary measures,” Mirvis said in a letter issued by his office. “Our Torah obligation to protect the sanctity of life transcends all other considerations," he said. "Therefore, with much pain and with the heaviest of hearts, in consultation with the Dayanim (judges) of the London Beit Din (rabbinical court), I have concluded that we have a Halachic imperative to suspend all activity at all of our synagogues until further notice,” Mirvis wrote. The order includes prayer services as well as educational, cultural and social gatherings. Morocco's Jewish communal council, Conseil des Communautés Israélites du Maroc (CCIM), sent similar guidelines to its communities, urging that "prayers at synagogues be halted until further notice." Also Tuesday, the Rabbinic Council of Australia and New Zealand (RCANZ) closed both countries' synagogues, calling it a "biblical duty." Turkey's Chief Rabbi Yitzhak Haliva demanded Wednesday that all the country's synagogues be closed. "We must not forget that any precautions we take," said Haliva, "are meant to deal with the ever creeping and nearing health risk and not to worsen it." "We have temporarily halted all prayers and meetings," he said. "I have no doubt the God will receive our prayers from our homes. I pray with all my heart that this period ends soon. May God bestow health upon us all." Chabad leaders in Brooklyn have decided to close the movement's biggest prayer house at 770 Eastern Parkway, also known as "770." U.S. President Donald Trump's advisor, Avi Berkowitz, held an urgent phone conference with ultra-Orthodox leaders>"We must not forget that any precautions we take," said Haliva, "are meant to deal with the ever creeping and nearing health risk and not to worsen it."&nbsp;</p> <p>"We have temporarily halted all prayers and meetings," he said.</p> <p>"I have no doubt the God will receive our prayers from our homes. I pray with all my heart that this period ends soon. May God bestow health upon us all."&nbsp;</p> <p>Chabad leaders in Brooklyn have decided to close the movement's biggest prayer house at 770 Eastern Parkway, also known as "770."&nbsp;</p> <P>&nbsp; <IMG id=captionImageElement6206459> </p><p>U.S. President Donald Trump's advisor, Avi Berkowitz, held an urgent phone conference with ultra-Orthodox leaders in America, urging them to the restrictions and guidelines seriously.&nbsp;</p> <p>Berkowitz called for the closure of all the yeshivas and to safeguard the children.&nbsp;</p> <p>Following the meeting, Satmar's Chief Rebbe Zalman Teitelbaum ordered all the community's schools and learning institutions closed until next Sunday, when a new assessment will take place.&nbsp;</p> message 56980120 Germany bans anti-Semitic group, raids homes Interior Ministry says 400 police officers seized firearms, propaganda material and small amounts of drugs during the raids targeting United German Peoples and Tribes, first time group associated with 'Reichsbuerger movement' has been proscribed Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56980120,00.html Thu, 19 Mar 2020 12:50:15 +03:00 Authorities conducted raids in 10 German states Thursday at premises linked to a group accused of pursuing a mix of anti-government and racist ideology. Germany’s Interior Minister Horst Seehofer issued a ban on the United German Peoples and Tribes, the first time a group associated with the so-called Reichsbuerger movement has been proscribed. Reichsbuerger, or Reich citizens, has similarities to the sovereign citizens' movements in the United States and elsewhere. They reject the authority of the modern German state and promote the notion of “natural rights,” often mixing this ideology with far-right politics and esoteric conspiracy theories. The Interior Ministry said around 400 police officers had seized firearms, propaganda material and small amounts of drugs during the raids on the homes of 21 leading members of the group. “We are dealing with a group that distributes racist and anti-Semitic writings and in doing so systematically poisons our free society,” Seehofer said in a statement. Authorities say members of the newly banned group, whose activities were focused in Berlin, had issued threats against German officials. message 56926750 NYC woman indicted for hate crime after attacking Israeli Victim suffers facial injuries in incident on subway after filming woman yelling anti-Semitic imprecations at Jewish man; attacker also shouted 'Allahu Akbar', cited Quran passages i24NEWS, Itamar Eichner https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56926750,00.html Wed, 11 Mar 2020 10:47:58 +03:00 New York City prosecutors have formally indicted a woman suspected of assaulting an Israeli college student after verbally abusing her on the subway. Footage of the incident, filmed in late December, shows 38-year-old Zarinah Ali using anti-Semitic epithets and saying it was a shame that more Jews were not killed in a December attack on a New Jersey kosher supermarket that left four dead. Israeli national Lihi Aharon published a video on Facebook where she is seen with scratches on her face as she recounts the events of the attack. The video shows her assailant cursing and yelling anti-Semitic insults even as she is arrested by police at a subway station. In the video that was taken by Aharon's friend, she recounts how she got on the subway and asked the woman to move her possessions so that she could sit down. The woman refused and Aharon went to sit next to a Jewish man with a yarmulke and a beard. According to Aharon, Ali then started directing anti-Semitic imprecations at the man and yelled "Allahu Akbar." “She was yelling at him, shouting at him, ‘Allahu Akbar’ and ‘Allah will kill you,’ ‘nasty Jews,’ she was citing passages from the Quran and ‘when you see a Jew you got to kill him’ and she used a lot of profanity,” Aharon told Fox News in an interview. Ali then knocked the phone out of Aharon's hand and scratched her face in retaliation. The student said she pushed the emergency button and police arrived almost immediately and arrested Ali while she was still hurling anti-Semitic slurs at Aharon. Concluding her video narrative, Aharon said the scar on her face is a mark of pride because she stood up "to defend my people and my country." "Do not be afraid to step up and shut people up," Aharon said. "Do not be afraid to fight and return the fight." message 56920460 Plan outlined for donations in Pittsburgh synagogue attack Nearly $1.3 million will help Tree of Life rebuild the severely damaged synagogue building but most of the funds will go to the families of those killed or seriously injured in the attack Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56920460,00.html Tue, 10 Mar 2020 12:57:58 +03:00 About $5.5 million that poured in from donors after the 2018 Pittsburgh synagogue attack that killed 11 worshippers is being distributed according to a plan outlined Monday by Jewish groups. The largest share, just over $3 million, will go to the families of those killed and to two people who were seriously injured. Donations are also being distributed to people who were in the Tree of Life building during the attack, in honor of first responders and to the congregations. The payouts are based on recommendations by an independent, volunteer committee created by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. The group's report issued in February said donors probably expected their gifts to help Tree of Life, which owns the building, as well as the two tenant congregations, Dor Hadash and New Light. Nearly $1.3 million will help Tree of Life rebuild the severely damaged synagogue building. Other payments will fund memorials related to the massacre, and the committee recommended the three congregations work together with victims and families on that effort. New Light co-president Barbara Caplan said in a release that a guiding principle is to foster healing and harmony in the wider Jewish community. The plan involves money received before April 2019, when Tree of Life established donation procedures that make it clear how donors want their money used. Tree of Life stopped accepting donations for the victims by the end of December. A western Pennsylvania truck driver, Robert Bowers, awaits trial for the attack. His lawyers are fighting efforts by federal prosecutors to seek a death sentence against Bowers. Bowers' attorney Judy Clarke has said in court filings that she has tried unsuccessfully to negotiate a life sentence for him. No trial date has been set. message 56910210 Yeshiva basketball team reaches first Sweet 16 New York-based The Maccabees have won their 29th game in a record-breaking season, brushing off fears of rise in anti-Semitism and spread of coronavirus Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56910210,00.html Sun, 08 Mar 2020 19:23:12 +03:00 First came the prayer ceremony at the conclusion of Shabbat with their families, then, the celebration on the basketball court and the overflowing joy of March Madness victory. New York based Yeshiva University, beat Penn State Harrisburg 102-83 on Saturday to reach the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Division III Tournament for the first time in the history of the Jewish Orthodox institution. The Maccabees, named after the ancient Jewish rebel warriors, fought against all odds, won their 29th straight game in a record-breaking season that began amid concerns over a global rise in anti-Semitism and that has now been engulfed by the new coronavirus. The game was played at an empty gym at Johns Hopkins University because of concerns over the virus. The legion of faithful Macs fans who chant out their names from the stands and often follow them on the road was replaced by the squeaking of sneakers and the unwavering support of their bench players, some wearing Jewish skullcaps, who chanted "De-fense! De-fense!" During a timeout with less than three minutes to go and the score at 94-72, some danced "Stronger" by Kanye West that blared from gym's speakers. At the final buzzer, the Macs hugged on the court an empty 1,100-seat Goldfarb Gymnasium and celebrated pumping their fists and singing in Hebrew: "When the month of Adar begins, joy increases!" "It means everything," forward Gabriel Leifer said about the victory and reaching the Sweet 16. He got his fourth triple-double of the season, scoring 10 points Saturday and leading all players with 20 rebounds, while delivering 10 assists. Leifer was voted the most outstanding player of the Skyline Conference tournament, which the Macs won to qualify for the NCAAs. "From the start of the year, after we lost in the conference final last year, we knew this year was going to be a big year for us," he said. Their records this season include the best start in school history, the longest winning streak and their first national ranking.ble of the season, scoring 10 points Saturday and leading all players with 20 rebounds, while delivering 10 assists.</p> <p>&nbsp;Leifer was voted the most outstanding player of the Skyline Conference tournament, which the Macs won to qualify for the NCAAs.</p> <p>"From the start of the year, after we lost in the conference final last year, we knew this year was going to be a big year for us," he said.</p> <p>Their records this season include the best start in school history, the longest winning streak and their first national ranking. They have hit the century mark in scoring in both of their NCAA tournament wins.</p> <p>Some of the families of the Macs who had traveled from across the U.S. to support them followed the game from a hotel where they had relocated after Yeshiva's team had its first hotel reservation in suburban Baltimore canceled over coronavirus fears.</p> <P>&nbsp; <IMG id=captionImageElement6120008> </p><p>"It's special because a lot of families drove up Friday, that was after everyone found out that they weren't allowed to go to the games," Leifer said, "it shows their support from beginning to the end, whether they can be there, whether they cannot, they're always there for us."</p> <p>A day earlier, the Macs beat Worcester Polytechnic Institute in what was believed to be the first U.S. sports event held without fans because of the new coronavirus. After the game, the players rushed back to their hotel before sundown on time for the Sabbath.</p> <p>While they waited for their next game, some wore prayer shawls, shared a traditional dinner and played card and board games with their families. They couldn't check scouting reports or watch the result of other games to find out who would be their next rival. But now they know. Next up is Randolph-Macon College in the Sweet 16.</p> <p>The Ashland, Virginia school is the No. 3 ranked team in Division III.</p> <p>"It's going to be awesome, "Leifer said, "it's an amazing experience, another game, and like message 56909260 High school students in Brazil give Hitler salute during class Image published on Instagram of teens mimicking Nazi gesture in support of classmate causes uproar; school principal summons involved students, hands them one-week suspension i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-56909260,00.html Sun, 08 Mar 2020 15:49:52 +03:00 A group of 11 students from a Brazilian high school displayed the Hitler salute in support of their fellow classmate who was running for class representative, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency reported. Students aged 16 to 17, enrolled at Saint Mary School in Recife, a private school in northeastern Brazil, stretched out their arms during a lesson, mimicking the gesture the Nazis used to show support for leader Adolf Hitler. The photo was published on Instagram on Wednesday with a message containing Nazi-related terms such as "Aryan" and "Fourth Reich," according to daily newspaper Folha de Sao Paulo and other Brazilian media reports. "He promises to be the new Fuehrer for the establishment of a new Reich," said the publication. On Thursday, the school principal summoned the students who were involved, gave them a one-week suspension and spoke to the parents as well. The Instagram account where the photo was posted has since been deleted. "We apologize to everyone who has been offended," the facility's management said in a statement. "Our school does not tolerate any behavior which goes against Christian and ethical values ​​and the appreciation of life as well as against respect for races, peoples, and beliefs." A similar controversy arose in the United States last year after a group of athletes from the Pacifica High School water polo team in Garden Grove, California were caught on camera giving a Hitler salute and singing a German World War II marching song during an award ceremony last year. The song sung by the Garden Grove athletes was a marching song written by German composer and member of the Nazi party Herms Niel in the 1930s Originally released in 1938, Niel's song became an instant hit in Germany during the Nazi regime. The song, titled Erika, referring to both a common German female name and the German word for heather, was adopted by the Wehrmacht armed forces and became unmistakably connected to Nazi times. The song has had a resurgence in popularier salute and singing a German World War II marching song during an award ceremony last year.</p> <P>&nbsp; <IMG id=captionImageElement6119551> </p><p>The song sung by the Garden Grove athletes was a marching song written by German composer and member of the Nazi party Herms Niel in the 1930s</p> <p>Originally released in 1938, Niel's song became an instant hit in Germany during the Nazi regime.</p> <p>The song, titled Erika, referring to both a common German female name and the German word for heather, was adopted by the Wehrmacht armed forces and became unmistakably connected to Nazi times.</p> <p>The song has had a resurgence in popularity in recent years, especially on anonymous online message boards such as 4chan, where users, notorious for their dark and highly offensive sense of humor and destructive online pranks, were behind numerous online controversies.</p> <p>Additionally, many remixes and renditions of the song are available on YouTube and have garnered millions of views.</p> <p>Local school officials said they will <a href="https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-5573486,00.html" class="bluelink" style="">launch an investigation into the incident</a>.</p> message