2021-06-15 09:09:00 59515370 NY Holocaust survivors celebrated at concert after isolation The survivors, most of whom are now in their 80s and 90s, suffered unspeakable horrors in concentration camps; organizer says their lesson is 'to keep going' adding that during pandemic they remained as strong as they ever were Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/rJ2tnjrod Tue, 15 Jun 2021 8:59:22 +03:00 Dozens of Holocaust survivors clapped, sang and danced Monday at a concert held in their honor in Brooklyn in the first large gathering for New York-area survivors after months of isolation during the coronavirus pandemic. The concert by popular Orthodox Jewish singer Yaakov Shwekey was organized by the Nachas Health and Family Network and other groups that help the more than 35,000 Holocaust survivors estimated to live in the New York City metropolitan area. "It's extremely good for the soul, for the heart, to see people coming out once again and socializing," said Dolly Rabinowitz, who sat in the front row of the Yeshivah of Flatbush auditorium joined by other Holocaust survivors and students of the Modern Orthodox Jewish school. The survivors, most of whom are now in their 80s and 90s, suffered unspeakable horrors in concentration camps. In the past year, many remained isolated at home because they were at a high risk of contagion from the fast-spreading virus. "To be out once again is like reviving ourselves. To sit among our children and grandchildren is heartwarming," said Rabinowitz, who lived through Auschwitz and the Death March. Many of the survivors arrived at Monday's concert in yellow school buses. "This feels like going back to school!" Henry Rosenberg, 92, told other survivors as he stepped off a bus and walked into the Yeshivah of Flatbush Joel Braverman High School. "It's good to feel the fresh air. It was hard," he later said about the pandemic. "We couldn't go to any places for many months." Some students greeted them inside and helped those with mobility issues to their seats in a cafeteria. Afterward they walked to the school theater for the show. Some held hands and choked back tears when they heard an instrumental version in violin and piano of "Ani Ma'amin," Hebrew for, "I believe," which was sung by many Jews who were herded into cattle cars on their way to concentration camps. During WWII, many of them were tattooed with ID numbers, n High School.</p> <p>"It's good to feel the fresh air. It was hard," he later said about the pandemic. "We couldn't go to any places for many months."</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19301176> <p>Some students greeted them inside and helped those with mobility issues to their seats in a cafeteria. Afterward they walked to the school theater for the show.</p> <p>Some held hands and choked back tears when they heard an instrumental version in violin and piano of "Ani Ma'amin," Hebrew for, "I believe," which was sung by many Jews who were herded into cattle cars on their way to concentration camps.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19301177> <p>During WWII, many of them were tattooed with ID numbers, shorn of hair and used as slave labor. Some nearly starved and witnessed family members killed. Sometimes, they'll share these experiences to teach younger generations about the horrors they endured at a time when global antisemitism is rising, while fewer young people know about the Holocaust and its death camps.</p> <p>"It's the unfortunate reality that some time from now, we're not going to have these Holocaust survivors to tell their story, so it's so crucial an critical for us to be with them, to get their stories and cherish them," said Michael Oved, 17, who recently graduated from the high school and will soon attend Harvard University.</p> <p>The lesson for other generations, Oved said, "is to keep going. These people have suffered through hell and back, yet they're here standing. And during the pandemic, they were just as strong as they ever were. So their message to us should be: Always, always persevere and never give up."</p> <p>Some Holocaust survivors regularly attend Nachas, Yiddish for "joy," which is part of a network of community centers that offer wide-ranging services to survivors. Dozens go there to socialize, receive legal assistance, study the Torah, exercise, get counseling and eat meals.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19301178> <p>Lillian Feintuch, 85 message 59452650 France launches parliamentary inquiry into Halimi verdict French-Jewish lawmaker Meyer Habib to head commission that will look into court decision not to try Kobili Traore, who confessed to the murder, on the grounds that he was suffering from drug-induced delirium at the time i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/article/ryOrRvCc00 Wed, 09 Jun 2021 21:30:37 +03:00 Outraged with France's final court of appeal's verdict in the Sarah Halimi murder, the Union of Democrats and Independents Party announced Wednesday it would establish a parliamentary commission of inquiry to investigate the Jewish pensioner's murder. The facts of the case are not in dispute; Halimi, a former kindergarten director was beaten in her Paris apartment before the assailant - Kobili Traore, her Muslim neighbor - tossed the 65-year-old out of the window. Traore yelled "Allahu akbar" (God is great) while committing the crime but France’s final court of appeal on criminal cases - in April 2021 - upheld a previous court verdict that he was not criminally responsible for the killing because he had carried it out during a psychotic episode, brought on through the prolonged use of cannabis. In France, all political parties are allowed, once per year, to initiate a parliamentary commission of inquiry. French-Israeli parliamentarian Meyer Habib initiated his party’s request to form the commission into the Halimi murder and was appointed to spearhead it, according to Israel Hayom. The court's verdict sparked outrage in France and across the Jewish world. French President Emmanuel Macron pressed for a change in the law, reasoning that "going crazy" after excessive drug use did not absolve an individual of criminal responsibility. “I’m thrilled to announce that in a few weeks, a parliamentary commission of inquiry will be formed to look into the deficiencies surrounding the case of Sarah Halimi,” said Habib. “I will do… everything in my power to expose the truth,” he added. Republished with permission from i24NEWS message 59443840 UAE welcomes first U.S. Jewish advocacy group in Arab state American Jewish Committee office in Abu Dhabi headed by veteran American diplomat, will focus on interfaith ties as Emirates presses on with plans to further ties with Israel despite tensions over recent Gaza war Reuters https://www.ynetnews.com/article/ryENeKn9O Tue, 08 Jun 2021 10:5:2 +03:00 The American Jewish Committee (AJC) advocacy group said it has opened an office in the United Arab Emirates, its first in the Arab region, in a move welcomed by the Gulf state's foreign minister to promote dialogue. The UAE and Bahrain established ties with Israel last year in U.S.-brokered deals called the Abraham Accords, becoming the first Arab states in more than a quarter century to break what had been a long-standing taboo in the region. "We are thrilled to have you," Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed al-Nahyan told the group's virtual annual global forum on Monday. "Your presence in the UAE is... part of changing mindsets." AJC Abu Dhabi: The Sidney Lerner Center for Arab-Jewish Understanding is headed by State Department veteran Marc Sievers, who in his almost four decades as a diplomat served in multiple Middle Eastern countries, including Israel, Morocco, Turkey, Iraq, Egypt and Saudi Arabia. The AJC said its new office will, among other things, promote Arab-Jewish and Muslim-Jewish ties, fight anti-Semitism and work with Jewish communities in the region. Sheikh Abdullah and his Bahraini counterpart Abdullatif Al-Zayani reiterated that the accords, which Sudan and Morocco have also signed, aimed to help bring lasting peace and prosperity through cooperation in fields such as technology and health. "We have to be tolerant to thrive... in a challenging neighborhood," the Emirati minister said. He said the global effort to "challenge extremism and radical ideas has not been appropriate". The UAE, which distrusts Islamist groups, does not allow political parties and shows little tolerance towards dissent. Local media is tightly controlled. The regional trade and tourism hub has pressed on with plans to further ties with Israel, though with less fanfare following Israel-Hamas hostilities last month and what Arab states have described as Israeli provocations in Jerusalem. Sheikh Abdullah said finding a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian cons such as technology and health.</p> <p>"We have to be tolerant to thrive... in a challenging neighborhood," the Emirati minister said. He said the global effort to "challenge extremism and radical ideas has not been appropriate".</p> <p>The UAE, which distrusts Islamist groups, does not allow political parties and shows little tolerance towards dissent. Local media is tightly controlled.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19051406> <p>The regional trade and tourism hub has pressed on with plans to further ties with Israel, though with less fanfare following Israel-Hamas hostilities last month and what Arab states have described as Israeli provocations in Jerusalem.</p> <p>Sheikh Abdullah said finding a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict would require "strategic" thinking on both sides. &nbsp;</p> message 59436880 David Dushman, last surviving Auschwitz liberator, dies aged 98 On January 27, 1945, the Red Army soldier used his T-34 Soviet tank to mow down the electric fence of the death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, helping to set prisoners free; he went on to become a top fencer in the Soviet Union AFP https://www.ynetnews.com/article/B1al4o95d Sun, 06 Jun 2021 23:24:56 +03:00 David Dushman, the last surviving soldier who took part in the liberation of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz in 1945, has died at the age of 98. Dushman, a Red Army soldier who later became an international fencer, died on Saturday, the International Olympic Committee said in a statement. On January 27, 1945, he used his T-34 Soviet tank to mow down the electric fence of Auschwitz in Nazi-occupied Poland, helping to set prisoners in the death camp free. "We hardly knew anything about Auschwitz," he said, recounting that day in an interview in 2015 with Sueddeutsche daily. But he saw "skeletons everywhere". "They staggered out of the barracks, sat and lay among the dead. Terrible. We threw them all our canned food and immediately went on to hunt down the fascists," he said. Only after the end of the war did he learn about the scale of the atrocities in the camp. Charlotte Knobloch, president of the Jewish Community of Munich and Upper Bavaria, said Dushman's death was "particularly painful". "Dushman was on the front line when the Nazi murder machinery was smashed in 1945; as the 'Hero of Auschwitz' he was one of the liberators of the concentration camp and saved countless lives," she said in a statement. "Today, he was one of the last to be able to recount this event from his own experience," she added, describing Dushman as a "brave, honest and sincere man". Of the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust, more than one million were murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau, most in its notorious gas chambers, along with tens of thousands of others including homosexuals, Roma and Soviet prisoners of war. Dushman was one of 69 soldiers in his division who survived the war, but he suffered serious injuries. Nevertheless, he went on to become a top fencer in the Soviet Union and later one of the world's greatest fencing coaches, the IOC said. Dushman coached the Soviet Union's women's fencing team from 1952 to 1988, and it was in this position that he also witnessed the ing Dushman as a "brave, honest and sincere man".</p> <p>Of the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust, more than one million were murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau, most in its notorious gas chambers, along with tens of thousands of others including homosexuals, Roma and Soviet prisoners of war.</p> <p>Dushman was one of 69 soldiers in his division who survived the war, but he suffered serious injuries. Nevertheless, he went on to become a top fencer in the Soviet Union and later one of the world's greatest fencing coaches, the IOC said.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19026409> <p>Dushman coached the Soviet Union's women's fencing team from 1952 to 1988, and it was in this position that he also witnessed the massacre of 11 Israeli team members by the radical Palestinian Black September group at the Munich Olympics in 1972.&nbsp;</p> <p>His lodgings at that time lay directly across from those of the Israelis. IOC chief Thomas Bach voiced sadness about Dushman's death. "When we met in 1970, he immediately offered me friendship and counsel, despite Mr Dushman's personal experience with World War II and Auschwitz, and he being a man of Jewish origin," said Bach, who is German."This was such a deep human gesture that I will never ever forget it," added the IOC president.</p> <p>Dushman lived in Austria for several years in the 1990s before relocating in 1996 to Munich, where German media said he died.Up to four years ago, he was still going almost daily to his fencing club there to give lessons, the IOC said.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><br></p> <p><br></p> message 59433170 Teens charged in Baltimore shooting of Israeli man Local police say William Clinton III, 18, and a 16-year-old and a 17-year-old are being held without bail for the May 3 killing of Efraim Gordon, who arrived from Israel to attend his cousin’s wedding Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/HJokvkqcd Sun, 06 Jun 2021 10:41:39 +03:00 Two juveniles and an 18-year-old have been charged with first-degree murder in the shooting of a 31-year-old Israeli man who was visiting relatives in Baltimore last month. Baltimore police said William Clinton III, 18, and a 16-year-old and a 17-year-old are being held without bail in the May 3 fatal shooting of Efraim Gordon. He was shot multiple times in what police said appeared to be a robbery. The Baltimore Sun reports that Gordon had traveled from Israel to Baltimore for a week’s visit to attend his cousin’s wedding. When he was shot in the Glen neighborhood, he was walking back to his aunt and uncle’s house, Councilman Isaac “Yitzy” Schleifer previously said. Law enforcement and “the cooperation of the community ... made these arrests possible,“ Schleifer wrote in a Facebook post after police announced the arrests. “Countless people” came forward with information and doorbell camera footage, Schleifer said in an interview. Gordon’s family raised $61,000 to return Gordon’s body to Israel and to offer a $30,000 reward for tips leading to an arrest. In an update on the fundraising campaign page, organizers said Gordon “has been buried respectfully.” “No family should be forced to endure the insufferable pain of losing a loved one to gun violence,” Mayor Brandon Scott said in a statement. The city has had 141 homicides so far this year, police say. Court records did not list an attorney for Clinton who could comment on his behalf. message 59416750 Homecoming to Israel for 'lost' Jews in India delayed by COVID-19 Some 100 members of the Bnei Menashe community were put in quarantine at a local Sikh temple after several of them became ill with the virus, delaying immigration to the Jewish state Reuters https://www.ynetnews.com/article/Hkid2HBcd Wed, 02 Jun 2021 22:3:59 +03:00 More than 100 Jews from India's northeastern Manipur state have had to delay plans to emigrate to Israel as family members fell ill with COVID-19 and were placed in quarantine in New Delhi. Soizagin, 40, who will soon renounce his Indian citizenship, calls his permanent move to Israel a "golden opportunity". "We have been very excited," said Soizagin who goes by only one name and is recuperating at a Sikh temple, which has been turned into a COVID care center. "(We've been delayed) just because of this COVID positivity. Otherwise...we should have left by 31st of last month." Soizagin is part of India's roughly 6,000-member Bnei Menashe community, which lives largely in Manipur and neighboring Mizoram state and has formally been recognized by Israel's rabbinical leaders as Jews. On Wednesday, about 40 Bnei Menashe were quarantined at the New Delhi Sikh temple, said Soizagin, who was dressed in an olive green T-shirt and black pajamas and donned a Jewish kippah skullcap. The tale of how Bnei Menashe or the "Children of Menashe" settled in an Indian region, sandwiched between Bangladesh and Myanmar, is grand in its sweep of history but short on scientific support. Exiled from ancient Israel by the Assyrian empire around 730 BC, a tribe is forced east and travels through Afghanistan and China before settling in what is now India's northeast. With time all that is left is a name -- Manasseh, Menasia or Manmase, an ancestor whose spirit the community invokes to ward off evil. That name is then linked to the Israelite tribe of Menashe, one of the biblical "Twelve Tribes of Israel", 10 of which disappeared after the Assyrian invasion. While search for conclusive proof of Bnei Menashe's Jewish origins continues, the community says some of their practices were similar to ancient Hebrew traditions. Shavei Israel, a Jerusalem-based organization which has been locating descendants of the lost tribes of Israel and bringing them home, has previously called the Bnei Menashe's northeast.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18982898> <p>With time all that is left is a name -- Manasseh, Menasia or Manmase, an ancestor whose spirit the community invokes to ward off evil.</p> <p>That name is then linked to the Israelite tribe of Menashe, one of the biblical "Twelve Tribes of Israel", 10 of which disappeared after the Assyrian invasion.</p> <p>While search for conclusive proof of Bnei Menashe's Jewish origins continues, the community says some of their practices were similar to ancient Hebrew traditions.</p> <p>Shavei Israel, a Jerusalem-based organization which has been locating descendants of the lost tribes of Israel and bringing them home, has previously called the Bnei Menashe's return a miracle.</p> <p><br></p> message 59399570 Quarter of top UK universities released potentially anti-Semitic comments, report suggests UK think tank claims student unions or faculty bodies at 12 of country's top 40 academic institutions published 'highly partisan' anti-Israel statements that may have breached widely agreed working definition of anti-Semitism i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/article/HJf0nG11500 Sun, 30 May 2021 19:13:57 +03:00 A report by a UK think tank claims that up to a quarter of Britain's leading universities released statements that veered into potential anti-Semitism at the height of the recent violence between the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip and Israel. The Pinsker Centre claimed that student unions or faculty bodies at 12 of the country's top 40 universities — including Oxford and Cambridge — published "highly partisan" anti-Israel statements that might have breached the widely agreed working definition of anti-Semitism, according to The Daily Telegraph. The center maintained that two highly partisan tropes were leveled against the Jewish state; namely that it was guilty of being both an "apartheid" state and one that was a "settler colonialist" entity. Its report supplied two main recommendations: The Charity Commission — an NMGD the regulates registered charities in England and Wales — should update its guidance to student unions to give wider and better protection to Jewish students on campus, and universities should adopt disciplinary frameworks to enforce the IHRA definition with sanctions, and government should cut funds to universities that fail to do this. The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition on anti-Semitism, adopted by the UK government, lists calling Israel a "racist endeavor" or "applying double standards" as examples of what could be anti-Semitic, depending on the context. All but three of 12 universities criticized in the report have adopted the IHRA definition. The Pinsker Centre drew a direct causal link between incendiary statements about the Gaza-Israel situation and the massive spike in anti-Jewish attacks on campuses across the UK. Anti-Semitic incidents during the 11-day conflict between Palestinian terror groups in the Gaza Strip and Israel, in general, saw a five-fold increase during and in the immediate aftermath of the fighting, according to the UK's Community Security Trust. message 59399530 Amazon removes Holocaust-themed anti-vaccine shirts Online retail giant delists t-shirt emblazoned with symbol of Nazi persecution of Jewish people, which was marketed as a fashion item for those who oppose COVID vaccines Itay Yaakov https://www.ynetnews.com/article/S1Al2Wb5d Sun, 30 May 2021 17:28:58 +03:00 Amazon retailer has removed from sale a novelty shirt emblazoned with a yellow star patch bearing the words “Not Vaccinated” that mimicked the badges that the Nazis forced Jews to wear during the Holocaust. The yellow star inscribed with the word "Jude" (German for Jew) remains one of the symbols of the Nazi genocide of six million Jews, and is still seen as a blatant symbol of anti-Semitism. According to the manufacturer of the now-removed product, 27Threads, the novelty shirt was designed for "vaccine opponents, medical freedom activists and freedom-lovers.” While this most recent design was made in protest of the limitations imposed on those who refuse to receive the coronavirus vaccine, the anti-vaccination movement in the United States had appropriated the yellow badge as a symbol of identification and protest before the emergence of COVID. Anti-Defamation League chief Jonathan Greenblatt raised concerns about this phenomenon in 2019. “It is simply wrong to compare the plight of Jews during the Holocaust to that of anti-vaxxers. Groups advancing a political or social agenda should be able to assert their ideas without trivializing the memory of the six million Jews slaughtered in the Holocaust,” Greenblatt told the Washington Post. The yellow badge was also used during a demonstration by anti-vaxxers in the Czech city of Prague in January this year, with the caption "I have not been experimented on, I have not been vaccinated." hatWRKS, a hat shop in Nashville, Tennessee, also made headlines after the owners uploaded a post promoting yellow star patches with the caption "Not Vaccinated.” Former United States Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder took to Twitter to express his outrage, while thousands of others left angry messages on the hat shop's Instagram promotion of the patches. “As a young school girl in Holland, my mother was forced to wear a yellow star by the Nazis to identify her as a Jew," Daalder wrote. "It’s beyond grotesque to sell this evil symbol in January this year, with the caption "I have not been experimented on, I have not been vaccinated."</p> <p>hatWRKS, a hat shop in Nashville, Tennessee, also made headlines after the owners uploaded a post promoting yellow star patches with the caption "Not Vaccinated.”&nbsp;</p> <p>Former United States Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder took to Twitter to express his outrage, while thousands of others left angry messages on the hat shop's Instagram promotion of the patches.</p> <p>“As a young school girl in Holland, my mother was forced to wear a yellow star by the Nazis to identify her as a Jew," Daalder wrote.&nbsp;</p> <p>"It’s beyond grotesque to sell this evil symbol to proclaim one’s not vaccinated. Where does this end?"</p> <DIV id=tvElement5726819></DIV><BR><p>CNN analyst Ana Navarro-Cárdenas also slammed the sale of the product.&nbsp;</p> <p>“I could not believe this could be for real. I like to think such stupidity, insensitivity and ignorance in America cannot be commonplace. It’s real.”</p> <p>The store owners later removed the post and apologized "for any insensitivity", but that did not stop protests outside the store on Saturday, CNN reported.&nbsp;</p> <p>The protesters carried signs reading "No Nazis in Nashville" and "Nashville condemns hatWRKS," reports said. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>"We're here to protest hate and ignorance with regard to what she's doing in selling yellow stars that are a symbol of the greatest atrocity the world has ever seen," Ron Rivlin, a Nashville resident, told a local news channel as he protested outside the store on Saturday.&nbsp;</p> message 59389000 'We would not have attained these achievements had we not made Aliyah' Tens of thousands of new immigrants move to Israel every year, each with their own personal story, but there are those whose immigration shapes and affects many other people's lives for the better Meital R. Fishman https://www.ynetnews.com/article/r1yErXTYu Thu, 27 May 2021 18:1:17 +03:00 A doctor who paved the way for women's medicine in Israel, an educator who trains Israeli diplomats and future leaders, and a mother of a child with Down syndrome who works to integrate children with special needs – this is the story of three Bonei Zion Prize recipients – all new immigrants, doing groundbreaking work in their fields, whose immigration to Israel affects us all. Tens of thousands of new immigrants move to Israel every year, each with their own personal story. However, there are those whose immigration shapes and affects many other people's lives. We met three new immigrants, whose work and achievements are shaping the image of the State of Israel: Prof. Marcia Javitt, Director of the Department of Radiology at Rambam Medical Center, a pioneer in the field of radiology and women's medicine; Michael Dickson, executive director of StandWithUs Israel, who has trained dozens of leaders and diplomats over the past 15 years; and Beth Steinberg, who founded a large volunteer organization to integrate children with special needs. The contributions of Javitt, Dickson and Steinberg earned them the Sylvan Adams Nefesh B’Nefesh Bonei Zion Prize. The prize has been given over the past seven years to immigrants from English-speaking countries in recognition of their achievements in the fields of science, medicine, non-profit activities and more. In addition, a Lifetime Achievement Award is bestowed as a well as a Young Leadership award for immigrants under 35 years old. 'In Israel I do significant things' When Prof. Marcia Javitt's husband first came up with the idea of immigrating to Israel, she was taken by surprise. "We are devout Zionists and I understood why this was important to you, but I am at the peak of my career, I did not serve in the military, and I have no connections in academia in Israel,” she said to him. She didn't understand what she would do in the country, she recalls. No one - not even Prof. Javitt herself - believed that a few years ltowed as a well as a Young Leadership award for immigrants under 35 years old.</p> <h3 class = "pHeader">'In Israel I do significant things'</h3> <p>When Prof. Marcia Javitt's husband first came up with the idea of immigrating to Israel, she was taken by surprise.&nbsp;</p> <p>"We are devout Zionists and I understood why this was important to you, but I am at the peak of my career, I did not serve in the military, and I have no connections in academia in Israel,” she said to him. &nbsp;She didn't understand what she would do in the country, she recalls.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18936274> <p>No one - not even Prof. Javitt herself - believed that a few years later, she would be the one who would make Aliyah before her husband, a surgeon by profession.&nbsp;</p> <p>It all began with a random meeting with a colleague during the Passover holiday in Jerusalem eight years ago. Her colleague mentioned to her that a Radiology department director’s position opened in Rambam Healthcare Campus, the largest hospital in northern Israel, and he pushed her to apply.</p> <p>She applied without expectations, and to her surprise - got the job. She did not have much time to prepare. &nbsp;Within weeks she went through an accelerated immigration process. The day after she landed in Israel in 2014, she started working at Rambam.&nbsp;</p> <p>“Everything happened so fast, but I knew it was the right thing to do. I have no way to explain it- it just felt like I came home.”</p> <DIV id=tvElement5799136></DIV><p>Prof. Javitt, who has an impressive history of managing large wards in hospitals in Washington and Philadelphia, is world-renowned in radiology and is considered one of the founders of Women's Imaging in Radiology.</p> <p>"Women's imaging is everything that has to do with using imaging in women's health," she explains.&nbsp;</p> <p>"There are unique medical issues for women, and it requires specific experience and knowledge. In recent years, the field has become more organized, and all the most interesting technologies have begun being developed in the field.”</p> <p>She was born in New York to an immigrant father from Russia and a mother born in the United States. As a child, her father fell ill with Parkinson's disease. &nbsp;Her mother took on the role of the main breadwinner.&nbsp;</p> <p>Javitt says: “Almost unheard of in the early 1960s, my mother was a company manager. &nbsp;She always told me that in order to succeed in the world, you have to think like a man and act like a woman."&nbsp;</p> <p>Javitt grew up in a Zionist Jewish home, but the family could not afford to send the children to a Jewish school - "that's why I don't have good Hebrew," she says.</p> <p>Contrary to her initial concerns, since she made Aliyah, Prof. Javitt has made greater achievements than ever before: she initiated innovative research for targeted treatment of prostate cancer, developed a new program for detecting breast cancer without ionizing radiation, and also founded the Rambam Point of Care Ultrasound Learning Center.&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition, she edits international scientific journals, writes textbooks, and has won awards for excellence in radiology. The most important achievement, for her, is teaching - she also serves as a lecturer to medical students at the Technion.</p> <p>"These achievements could not have happened so quickly in the United States. Rambam has many excellent physicians in all subspecialties who are every bit as qualified and professional when compared to those in the United States. People here are just as meticulous, but they work a lot harder. I have lived in Israel for six years and feel that I am doing more meaningful things than ever before."</p> <h3 class = "pHeader">Make Israelis better leaders</h3> <p>The work of Michael Dickson (43), for Israel and for the Jewish people, which began in London where he was born and raised, reached new heights upon immigrating to Israel. In London he was active in the Jewish community, serving as Director of Informal Jewish Education at the Jews’ Free School (JFS), the largest and oldest Jewish educational institution in the world.&nbsp;</p> <DIV id=tvElement5799137></DIV><p>As a result of one of the educational activities at the school, he contacted the pro-Israel organization StandWithUs to receive informative materials about Israel, which led to a fruitful cooperation over the years.</p> <p>When Dickson decided to make Aliyah fifteen years ago, the organization hired him to establish and grow a StandWithUs branch in Israel.&nbsp;</p> <p>"The idea was to work with students and tourists, who would not only experience Israel, but could also go home and explain to people about the country. Deal with the hard questions."</p> <p>In the summer of 2006, at the end of the Second Lebanon War, Dickson landed in Israel with his wife and two young children (the couple now have five children).&nbsp;</p> <p>"At the time, I was interviewed by two UK newspapers and asked why a British guy would want to live in a war zone," he recalled.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18936275> <p>He describes his arrival to Israel, describing an unforgettable situation from his early days in Israel: "My oldest daughter was two and a half years old at the time. One day, when I came to pick her up from kindergarten, she had a crown on her head with a Star of David on it. We were walking down the street, and I thought to myself, in London I wouldn't feel comfortable walking around like this. Here it was so natural."&nbsp;</p> <p>Since he began his job, the Israeli branch of the Los Angeles-founded organization has grown to become an international center.</p> <p>StandWithUs was one of the first of similar orgs to invest in Israel education awareness on social networks in the mid-2000s.&nbsp;</p> <p>"Today we reach millions of people, even from the Arab world. We get messages from people from the Palestinian Authority and Iran telling us they support Israel," he says, his eyes lighting up.&nbsp;</p> <p>When asked: "What does Israel represent to you?" Dickson replies without thinking twice: resilience.&nbsp;</p> <p>He even wrote a book about it, ISResilience – What Israelis Can Teach The World - which was published several months ago (with psychologist Dr. Naomi Baum). &nbsp;</p> <p>"In the 15 years I have been in Israel, I have discovered how strong Israelis are, how they bounce back quickly after terrorist attacks and wars. Now, during the coronavirus period, resilience is the key word, and the world has much to learn from Israelis. In the book, we explore the issue of resilience through the story of Israelis of a diversity of backgrounds. In September, we will participate in a large international conference of experts, to talk about Israeli resilience."</p> <p>Do you yourself feel Israeli?</p> <p>"Yes, absolutely. Although I still have British manners and I still drink tea with milk - I also barbecue on Israeli Independence Day. From the minute I arrived in Israel, I felt like I had returned home. Being Israeli is a part of who we are. And immigrants bring wonderful things with them to Israel, we all have something to contribute".</p> <h3 class = "pHeader">Innovation, entrepreneurship and immigration</h3> <p>The Aliyah story of Beth Steinberg (59) is the story of a late bloomer, whose leadership and entrepreneurial abilities were discovered in her mid-40s, after immigrating to Israel. Beth grew up in Long Island, is married with three sons, the youngest of which, Akiva - now 24 - has Down syndrome and autism.&nbsp;</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18936276> <p>"When Akiva was born, I was sure I missed the chance to make Aliyah. All my family members had already made Aliyah in the '80s and '90s, we're the last ones left in the United States."</p> <p>The final decision to make Aliyah came in 2005.&nbsp;</p> <p>"We arrived at my little sister's wedding in Israel, and it was very difficult for me to come back, to know that I would not be close to her, and that I would not see her have children. I felt something was missing in my life. That's when I realized it was time for us to come to Israel and be with the family."&nbsp;</p> <p>Immigrating to Israel with a child with special needs is not an easy challenge, says Steinberg, and admits that the rapid adjustment to life in Israel was a surprise.&nbsp;</p> <p>"We were afraid that Akiva would not find a framework like there was in New York, but we found that in Israel the service is just as good, and that the attitude here is much more intimate and caring. &nbsp;Luckily, our whole family was already here, and we've had a lot of support. Maybe I acclimated quickly because I was already a mature woman with experience, I knew how to make things work, I knew how to ask for help".&nbsp;</p> <p>The family settled in Jerusalem, and their integration was swift. In preparation for the first summer vacation in Israel, when Steinberg realized that there was no suitable framework for summer camps for children like Akiva, she initiated one with several mothers, including Miriam Avraham, an immigrant from New York, who would later become her partner.&nbsp;</p> <p>A group of women organized a two-week summer camp which gained momentum. Within a few years, the local initiative became an influential organization, which works extensively with children and adolescents with special needs.&nbsp;</p> <p>Today, Shutaf Inclusion Programs in Jerusalem offers inclusive, informal education programs for children, teens, and young adults.&nbsp;</p> <p>Approximately 300 participants aged 6 to 23 enjoy integrated activities throughout the year: camps during Hanukkah holidays, Passover and during the summer, a young leadership program for youth and young adults, interactive workshops about integration, and parental meetings&nbsp;</p> <p>"We have activities and programs for children and adolescents with a wide range of disabilities, learning problems, behavior or mental health challenges. Every message 59386900 Fury as Jewish actor Seth Rogen mocks anti-Semitism activist Comedian used wind emoji to reply to Twitter post by Jewish journalist Eve Barlow in which she shared article detailing abuse she received for defending Israel, apparently agreeing with bullying nickname 'Fartlow' Yulia Karra https://www.ynetnews.com/article/HJiq6T2Ku Thu, 27 May 2021 11:48:11 +03:00 Jewish actor Seth Rogan sparked outrage on Thursday after mocking a journalist who wrote an article expressing concern about the rise of anti-Semitism. Journalist Eve Barlow, who is also Jewish, published a link on her Twitter account to a piece she wrote for the Tablet Magazine, in which she compared the current rise of anti-Semitism on social media to digital pogroms. In the piece, Barlow mentions how she received a barrage of abuse from pro-Palestinian brigade on social media after defending Israel during the recent war in Gaza. She wrote that among the many derogatory slurs directed at her, the most frequent was the mocking of her name as “Eve Fartlow”. When Barlow posted the article on her own Twitter account, Rogen was quick to mock her, replying to her tweet with an emoji of a gust of wind, indicating he agreed with the bullying nickname. Rogen's reply received over 10,000 likes and 765 retweets as a result, fueling the abuse directed at the Jewish journalist. Some, however, came to the defense of Barlow, including former Democratic New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind. "How desperate are you to be liked by Jew haters that you’re trolling a Jew on their behalf?" he wrote, addressing Rogen. Someone else replied, "@Sethrogen you chose to cyber bully a Jewish woman on her article about being cyber bullied due to antisemitism?" Rogen last year made headlines for saying the idea of Israel is "antiquated and "makes no sense" in today's world. During his apperance on WTF podcast hosted by Marc Maron, Rogen claimed he was “fed a huge amount of lies about Israel” while growing up as a Jewish youth in his native Canada. When asked if he believes Israel has the right to exist, Rogen gave a vague answer, alluding to the fact that he doesn't. “To me it just seems an antiquated thought process,” Rogen said. “If it is for religious reasons, I don’t agree with it, because I think religion is silly." message 59386530 Israel envoy to UAE warns of 'Kristallnacht' moment Eitan Na'eh sounds alarm over rise in anti-Semitic attacks around the world in the wake of the Gaza war between Israel and Hamas; envoy made the statements during Holocaust memorial exhibition in UAE, first ever in Mideast AFP https://www.ynetnews.com/article/r1zjra3FO Thu, 27 May 2021 10:29:41 +03:00 Israel's ambassador to the UAE warned on Wednesday of a "Kristallnacht moment", with anti-Semitism on the rise, at a Holocaust memorial exhibition billed as a first for the Middle East. Eitan Na'eh, installed as envoy to the United Arab Emirates after the two countries struck a historic normalization deal last year, said it was "remarkable" that the exhibition was being held in the Arab world. "Who would have dreamt 70 or 80 years ago that an Israeli ambassador and a German ambassador would sit here together, in an Arab country, visiting a Holocaust remembrance exhibition," he said. But Na'eh sounded alarm over anti-Jewish attacks that have erupted in the wake of recent hostilities between Israel and Hamas, the Palestinian terror group that controls the Gaza Strip. World leaders, including U.S. President Joe Biden and Germany's Angela Merkel, have condemned acts of aggression that followed the deadly violence which broke out this month. "After Gaza, where we are? We are in the Kristallnacht moment where synagogues are attacked, Jews are violently attacked again on the streets of Europe," the Israeli envoy said, referring to the 1938 torching and ransacking of synagogues and Jewish-owned businesses across Germany by Nazi mobs. "We see the ugly face of anti-Semitism rising again in the streets of Europe and elsewhere and then we come here, to an Arab country... and we come to a Holocaust exhibition," he said, praising openness and tolerance in the UAE. The exhibition, held at the private Crossroads of Civilisations Museum in Dubai, included stories of Arabs and Muslims who protected Jews during the Holocaust and saved them from death at the hands of the Nazis. The Abraham Accords - signed with Israel by the UAE, Bahrain, Sudan and Morocco last year - were condemned as treasonous by Palestinian leaders who feared they undercut their demands for a state. After the crisis in Gaza erupted, Israel's new Arab partners were forced to change course and issue critical rhere, to an Arab country... and we come to a Holocaust exhibition," he said, praising openness and tolerance in the UAE.</p> <p>The exhibition, held at the private Crossroads of Civilisations Museum in Dubai, included stories of Arabs and Muslims who protected Jews during the Holocaust and saved them from death at the hands of the Nazis.</p> <p>The Abraham Accords - signed with Israel by the UAE, Bahrain, Sudan and Morocco last year - were condemned as treasonous by Palestinian leaders who feared they undercut their demands for a state.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18666662> <p>After the crisis in Gaza erupted, Israel's new Arab partners were forced to change course and issue critical rhetoric, putting strain on the agreements that were billed as a game-changer for Middle East peace prospects.&nbsp;</p> <p>However, Na'eh shrugged off the statements. "I don't think they were strongly worded. I think at least to our ears the UAE has called for the cessation of killing on both sides," he said.&nbsp;</p> message 59383560 Pope kisses Auschwitz survivor's tattoo during general audience Lidia Maksymowicz, who was deported to Auschwitz at the age of 3, showed the number tattooed on her arm by the Nazis to Pope Francis, who leaned over and kissed it without a word; 'We understood each other with a glance' she says Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/ry11K1RjYd Wed, 26 May 2021 17:39:45 +03:00 Pope Francis has kissed the tattoo of an Auschwitz survivor during a general audience on Wednesday. Lidia Maksymowicz, a Polish citizen who was deported to Auschwitz from her native Belarus by the age of 3, showed the pope the number tattooed on her arm by the Nazis, and Francis leaned over and kissed it. Maksymowicz told Vatican News that she didn't exchange words with the pope. "We understood each other with a glance," she said. Maksymowicz has participated in events sponsored by Sant'Egidio aimed at educating youth about the Holocaust. She spent three years in the children's area of the camp, and was subjected to experiences by Josef Mengele, known as the "Angel of Death." When the camp was freed, she was taken in by a Polish family. The pope has paid tribute to Holocaust survivors in the past, including a 2014 visit to Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Israel and a visit in February to the Rome apartment of a survivor, 88-year-old Hungarian-born writer and poet Edith Bruck. The Vatican said that during the hour-long visit, Francis told her: "I came to thank you for your witness and to pay homage to the people martyred by the craziness of Nazi populism." "And with sincerity I repeat the words I pronounced from my heart at Yad Vashem, and that I repeat in front of every person who, like you, suffered so much because of this: "Forgive, Lord, in the name of humanity," the pontiff told Bruck, according to the Vatican's account of the private meeting. message 59376780 After ceasefire, tensions over Mideast still boil on California campus With growing numbers of young American Jews becoming more critical of Israel, Jewish students who believe the Jewish state has the tight to defend itself say they feel isolated as they are labeled 'white colonizers' by pro-Palestine brigade Reuters https://www.ynetnews.com/article/HJrT2r9FO Tue, 25 May 2021 14:52:19 +03:00 Lea Toubian was deep into an online discussion with university administrators about the safety of Jewish students when news of a truce between Israel and Palestinian militant group Hamas was relayed to the group. It left her with some hope that tensions on campus would ease. Now the senior at the University of California, Santa Barbara says she is worried an expected measure this week will reignite divisions at the beachside school, where the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has long been a source of discord, driving a wedge between even Democrats like herself and liberal groups on campus. On Wednesday, a group of students are planning to submit a resolution to the student body senate calling on the university to sell stocks it holds in companies that supply Israel with equipment or services that further its military campaigns or violate the rights of Palestinians in Gaza or the West Bank. While such resolutions from the so-called Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions or BDS movement are largely symbolic, UC Santa Barbara is the only school in the University of California system which has never passed one. Mainstream Jewish organizations, including Hillel, an influential group that is active on 550 North American colleges and universities, want to avoid the college being the last domino to drop. "To bring something like this now is about the craziest thing that I can imagine," said Toubian, a Hillel member who just ended her term as student body president last week and who says she is supportive of both Israel and Palestinian rights. "It only serves to divide and inflame the campus climate." The latest flare up in the conflict between Israel and Hamas has reopened fault lines for some young, liberal American Jews whose progressive ideals clash with their religious or community identities. Some like Alia Sky, a 21-year-old Jewish-American, have come to oppose Israel outright. A member of the Students for Justice in Palestine, the UC Santa Barbara senior supports the resoubian, a Hillel member who just ended her term as student body president last week and who says she is supportive of both Israel and Palestinian rights. "It only serves to divide and inflame the campus climate."</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18616758> <p>The latest flare up in the conflict between Israel and Hamas has reopened fault lines for some young, liberal American Jews whose progressive ideals clash with their religious or community identities.</p> <p>Some like Alia Sky, a 21-year-old Jewish-American, have come to oppose Israel outright. A member of the Students for Justice in Palestine, the UC Santa Barbara senior supports the resolution as a way to condemn Israel, even as last week's ceasefire continues to hold.</p> <p>"Israel is ethnically cleansing Palestinians. It's a genocide," Sky said.</p> <p>Like many young American Jews interviewed, Sky said her views had evolved from earlier years when she was influenced by relatives who described Israel in mostly glowing terms. She said classes on the Middle East in her sophomore year and involvement with the SJP group were critical to her shift.</p> <p>For some, the racial protests that followed the 2020 killing of Minneapolis Black man, George Floyd, by a white police officer helped them see Palestinians in a new light.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18616759> <p>A survey published this month by the Pew Research Center showed about half of U.S. Jews under the age of 30 described themselves as emotionally attached to Israel, compared with two-thirds of those 65 and above.</p> <p>The same poll found 37 percent of U.S. Jews ages 18-29 said the United States was too supportive of Israel, more than double who felt that way in the 65-plus cohort.</p> <p>Zachary Federman, a student at Brown University, said many Jewish students believed they were taught a "sugar coated" version of Israel in their youth.</p> <p>"I think younger Jews continuously are more likely to question narratives of unequivocal support that we've been fed," said Federman, who is the co-president of Brown's chapter of J Street U, a self-described pro-Israel, pro-peace group committed to a two-state solution.</p> <p>The trend towards greater scrutiny of Israel dovetails with the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, whose lawmakers have tried to block a $735 million sale of precision-guided weapons to Israel in response to the conflict.</p> <p>Jessy Gonzalez, one of the authors of the Santa Barbara resolution, said he was optimistic it would fare better than the six previous resolutions - all of which failed, including the latest in 2019 which was defeated in a 14-10 vote.</p> <p>Gonzalez, a first year student, acknowledged passage might not lead to immediate actions by the school. But he said he still sees significance in sending a message that UC students don't want to support companies that help Israel to "destroy Palestinian lands."</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18616760> <p>The movement to boycott Israel has been building on U.S. college campuses for years, gathering momentum following the 2014 Gaza war and the emergence of a clutch of Democratic lawmakers, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, who are critical of how Israel treats the Palestinians. Even so, the BDS movement has little support in the U.S. Congress.</p> <p>Of the 83 resolutions put to a vote at U.S. universities since 2015, 52 percent have passed and the remainder failed, according to the AMCHA Initiative, a non-profit organization which aims to combat antisemitism at U.S. universities.</p> <p>Opponents of the BDS movement often call such resolutions antisemitic, saying they hold Israel to a higher standard and paint a one-sided narrative ignoring attacks from Hamas. Practically, they are also not legally binding and generally do not lead a university to divest.</p> <p>Rabbi Evan Goodman, executive director of Santa Barbara Hillel, worries the resolution could nevertheless inflame tensions on campus. He said the online discussion with administrators was prompted in part by an incident in which a group of Jewish students were heckled by others yelling "from the river to the sea", a phrase associated with Arab calls to wipe Israel off the map.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18616761> <p>As Toubian prepares to graduate, she worries students who share her views will face an increasingly polarized environment in which they must make binary choices about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and other issues.</p> <p>Toubian said it has been difficult to be both a Democrat and supportive of Israel, which she believes has a right to defend itself. She says she's been called "a white colonizer" and "violent towards people of color" for her beliefs.</p> <p>Toubian says Jewish students are feeling scared and isolated, with some removing their yarmulke and other symbols of their faith.</p> <p>For them, she said, the resolution is "a huge source of dread."</p> <p><br></p> message 59376260 BBC opens probe into reporter who tweeted 'Hitler was right' In a tweet from 2014, Tala Halawa - Ramallah-based BBC digital reporter - calls Israel 'worse than Nazis'; UK broadcaster, however, has not fired the reporter claiming the tweet predates her employment with them i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/article/rJjlcN5t00 Tue, 25 May 2021 12:45:54 +03:00 The BBC has launched an investigation into one of its reporters who wrote on Twitter that "Hitler was right." Tala Halawa, a Ramallah-based BBC digital reporter, appears to have published the tweet in 2014 during a previous war between Israel and terror factions in Gaza, when she was working for 24FM, a Palestinian radio station. "#Israel is more #Nazi than #Hitler! Oh, #Hitler was right #IDF go to hell. #PrayForGaza," read the tweet. The screenshot of the disturbing tweet was published on Sunday by Honest Reporting, an Israeli organization that works to promote a fair coverage of Israel in international media. Halawa has since deleted her Twitter account. Last week, Halawa was credited on the BBC website for co-writing an article titled "Israel-Gaza Violence: Children Who Died in Conflict," reflecting on the 11-day war in the Hamas-controlled enclave that ended on Friday. “These tweets predate the individual’s employment with the BBC but we are nevertheless taking this very seriously and are investigating,” a spokesperson for the UK broadcaster said. Halawa had worked for six months as a researcher for The New Yorker, before being hired at the BBC. message 59375170 New York governor ramps up police security for Jewish communities In a tweet, Andrew Cuomo says he is taking proactive steps after nationwide increase in anti-Semitic hate crimes in the wake of the Gaza war 'to ensure Jewish New Yorkers - and New Yorkers of all faiths - are safe' i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/article/H11IplqKu Tue, 25 May 2021 8:20:31 +03:00 New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has ordered the police to ramp up security patrols for Jewish communities in the wake of violent anti-Semitic attacks that have recently occurred in the city, according to a statement Monday. “In the wake of the unacceptable recent increase in anti-Semitic hate crimes nationwide, I am proactively deploying State Troopers to provide security at Jewish religious, educational, and community facilities,” he said in a statement. “We will do all we can to help ensure Jewish New Yorkers — and New Yorkers of all faiths — are safe,” Cuomo said on Twitter. The move comes after a worrying increase in anti-Semitic incidents and attacks on Jews by Palestinian activists since the start of the latest round of cross-border violence between Israel and Gaza terror groups, which ended on Friday. The violence against Jews was not limited to New York, with Los Angeles police opening a hate crime investigation last week after a pro-Palestinian mob attacked Jews dining at a sushi restaurant. More than 200 Palestinians died in the conflict and Israel claims the casualties were mostly combatants, while a dozen Israelis were killed by more than 4,000 rockets. Protests around the world sprung up as pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian sympathizers made their voices heard. However, numerous cases of anti-Semitic attacks prompted harsh condemnation from leaders. U.S. President Joe Biden condemned the "despicable" attacks on the Jewish community on Monday. "It's up to all of us to give hate no safe harbor," he said. message 59371870 Biden condemns attacks on U.S. Jewish community as 'despicable' POTUS says 'it's up to all of us to give hate no safe harbor' amid spike in anti-Semitic attacks following Gaza conflict; Israeli ambassador says 'demonization of Israel is clearly sparking rise in anti-Semitism' Reuters https://www.ynetnews.com/article/rJU95XtFd Mon, 24 May 2021 17:0:37 +03:00 U.S. President Joe Biden condemned violence against Jewish communities in the United States and abroad on Monday after a string of attacks amid the conflict between Israel and Gaza's Hamas rulers. Physical or verbal assaults were reported against Jews in New York City, Los Angeles and South Florida during the 11 days of fighting in the region. "The recent attacks on the Jewish community are despicable, and they must stop. I condemn this hateful behavior at home and abroad. it's up to all of us to give hate no safe harbor," Biden wrote in a Twitter post. Gilad Erdan, Israel's ambassador to the United States, tweeted his thanks in response and said he hoped the assailants were swiftly brought to justice and hate crimes deterred. "The demonization of Israel is clearly sparking this rise in antisemitism. It must be stopped," Erdan wrote. Five major Jewish groups urged Biden on Friday to call out anti-Semitism and recommended specific actions, including fighting hate on college campuses and enhanced security for religious institutions. In a letter, the groups said there have been numerous anti-Semitic incidents around the world and in the United States, including on social media, since the Gaza conflict began. "The perpetrators of these attacks deliberately targeted Jewish institutions and individuals for no other reason than their religion, justifying it with age-old anti-Semitic tropes, exaggerated claims, and inflammatory rhetoric," the letter said. The letter was signed by the American Jewish Committee, the Anti-Defamation League, Hadassah, Jewish Federations of North America and the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Joseph Borgen, 29, said he was attacked in New York's Times Square on Thursday night by a group of people who shouted anti-Semitic slurs at him. A video of the attack on Borgen, who wore a Jewish skullcap, was broadcast repeatedly on cable news television at the weekend. "As long as more and more awareness can be brought to thisgion, justifying it with age-old anti-Semitic tropes, exaggerated claims, and inflammatory rhetoric," the letter said.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18591387> <p>The letter was signed by the American Jewish Committee, the Anti-Defamation League, Hadassah, Jewish Federations of North America and the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America.</p> <p>Joseph Borgen, 29, said he was attacked in New York's Times Square on Thursday night by a group of people who shouted anti-Semitic slurs at him. A video of the attack on Borgen, who wore a Jewish skullcap, was broadcast repeatedly on cable news television at the weekend.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18591388> <p>"As long as more and more awareness can be brought to this issue, hopefully, some positive change can be made," he told CNN on Monday.</p> <p>A man was arrested and several others were being sought in connection with the attack.</p> <p>An Egyptian-mediated ceasefire between Israel and Hamas held into a fourth day on Monday. Medical officials said 248 people were killed in Gaza during the 11 days of fighting.</p> <p>Medics said rocket fire and a guided missile attack killed 13 people in Israel.</p> message 59367120 Man hurls feces, expletives outside Florida synagogue Local police commissioner says it was no accident that incident came off heels of 11 days of fighting between Israel and Hamas, adds that international events cause targeting of Orthodox Jewish community Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/Hyebdxutd Sun, 23 May 2021 21:2:0 +03:00 A man yelled anti-Semitic remarks at a rabbi in front of a South Florida synagogue. He returned and dumped a bag of human feces in front of the building, authorities said. Cellphone video captured the unidentified man on an electric bicycle as he went on a rant outside the Chabad of South Broward on Friday, according to Miami television station WSVN. The man left and returned a short time later, carrying a bag or pillowcase that contained human feces, said Hallandale Beach Police Capt. RaShana Dabney-Donovan. He dumped the bag in front of the synagogue and yelled, “Jews should die," according to a police report. He also spat at a menorah near a sidewalk, according to the police. Hallandale Beach Commissioner Anabelle Lima-Taub said it’s no accident these incidents happened days after an 11-day conflict between Israel and Hamas that has since led to a ceasefire. “It seems that every time there is an uprising, or a situation globally or nationally, easily identifiable members of our religious community, specifically the Orthodox Jewish community, are a target,” she said. Earlier this month, a Hallandale Beach man reported having rocks thrown at him as he walked to the Chabad of South Broward. “It’s very important for us to combat these types of incidents,” said Dabney-Donovan. message 59365950 Suspect arrested in attack on LA Jewish diners Unidentified man arrested Friday night on suspicion of assault with deadly weapon for his part in incident instigated by pro-Palestinian group and condemned by city's mayor as an 'organized, anti-Semitic attack' i24NEWS https://www.ynetnews.com/article/S1kfdcPt00 Sun, 23 May 2021 15:40:13 +03:00 Los Angeles police on Saturday said that they had arrested a man suspected of being part of the pro-Palestinian group that attacked Jewish diners last week, during the latest round of hostilities between Israel and Gaza's terrorist groups. A police statement said that the unidentified man was arrested on Friday night on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon at a residence outside of the city of Los Angeles. The arrest was made with the assistance from a U.S. Marshals Service task force. The violent attack was caught on video and circulated on social media. Witnesses said that a convoy of Palestinian supporters holding Palestinian flags rolled up to a sushi restaurant in the Beverly Grove area of Los Angeles while shouting anti-Semitic and anti-Israel slurs. According to the witnesses, the perpetrators of the attack asked the diners which ones of them were Jewish. The brawl allegedly erupted when two diners at the sushi restaurant affirmed that they were Jewish. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti described the incident as an “organized, anti-Semitic attack.” The Anti-Defamation League - which works to counter attacks on the global Jewish community - welcomed the news of the arrest. "The diligent efforts by LAPD and other law enforcement agencies sends a clear message that hate crimes targeting the safety of any group of individuals will not be tolerated," said Jeffrey Abrams, regional director of ADL Los Angeles. Another alleged anti-Semitic attack in the Los Angeles area was recently caught on video, which showed two drivers trying to run over a Jewish man. The Anti-Defamation League announced a reward of $5,000 for any information leading to the arrests of the people involved in the incident. Article republished with permission from i24NEWS message 59349760 L.A. police to investigate anti-Semitic attack as hate crime City’s mayor furious after members of a car caravan flying Palestinian flags attacks outdoor diners at a restaurant as violence in Israel and the Gaza Strip intensified Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/Bygj7cQtO Thu, 20 May 2021 11:7:13 +03:00 A brawl involving pro-Palestinians who attacked Jewish diners at a Los Angeles restaurant will be investigated as a hate crime, the city’s mayor said. Witnesses said members of a car caravan flying Palestinian flags attacked outdoor diners just before 10 pm Tuesday at a sushi restaurant in the Beverly Grove area as violence in Israel and the Gaza Strip intensified. The Los Angeles Times said a witness, who asked to remain anonymous for safety reasons, said some people from the caravan threw bottles and chanted “death to Jews” and “free Palestine.” “Somebody in one of the cars driving by started throwing glass bottles or glass cups at the tables and they shattered everywhere,” a woman diner, who didn’t want to be identified, told KCBS-TV. Several cars stopped and men got out, began running toward the tables and began asking “Who’s Jewish?” the woman said. KTLA-TV reported that a witness, who was not identified, said fighting erupted when two men replied they were. The video showed a man being punched on a sidewalk. The man, who wished to be identified only as M, told KABC-TV that he was helping plan an upcoming wedding with four Jewish friends when the car caravan rolled up. The video showed some men dressed in black getting out of a car and pushing M’s friend to the ground. M said grabbed a metal stanchion. The video showed him swinging it at attackers. M said he grabbed it to scare the men. “There were many girls behind us. I was scared that they would attack everybody,” he said. M was followed to his car, punched and pepper-sprayed, and was treated at a hospital, he said. Restaurant staff rushed patrons inside, locked the doors and called police. No arrests were immediately made. Police said five victims were punched or hurt by broken glass, but nobody was seriously injured. At least three suspects were being sought. Mayor Eric Garcetti, in tweets posted Wednesday afternoon, said the LAPD is looking into the assault as a hate crime and condemned what he calhowed him swinging it at attackers.</p> <p>M said he grabbed it to scare the men.</p> <p>“There were many girls behind us. I was scared that they would attack everybody,” he said.</p> <p>M was followed to his car, punched and pepper-sprayed, and was treated at a hospital, he said.</p> <p>Restaurant staff rushed patrons inside, locked the doors and called police.</p> <p>No arrests were immediately made.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18392275> <p>Police said five victims were punched or hurt by broken glass, but nobody was seriously injured. At least three suspects were being sought.</p> <p>Mayor Eric Garcetti, in tweets posted Wednesday afternoon, said the LAPD is looking into the assault as a hate crime and condemned what he called an “organized, anti-Semitic attack.”</p> <p>“Jewish Angelenos, like all residents, should always feel safe in our city,” he posted. “L.A. is a city of belonging, not of hate.”</p> <p>A weekend protest in West Los Angeles in support of Palestinians drew thousands of peaceful protesters. An earlier Tuesday demonstration outside the Israeli consulate also was peaceful and an organizer, Amani Barakat, told KCBS-TV that he wouldn’t condone violence.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18392276> <p>“We’ve organized many protests, Saturday’s protest we had more than 20,000 people that showed up and not one single incident,” Barakat said.</p> <p>The Council on American-Islamic Relations for Greater Los Angeles condemned the incident.</p> <p>“As a civil rights and advocacy organization, we support everyone’s right to free speech, the right to assemble and rally in support of their respective political views,” Executive Director Hussam Ayloush said in a statement. “However, despite heightened tensions in Palestine and Israel, it is never acceptable for that conflict to spill over into our streets and cities. Violence and intimidation should be condemned, investigated, and if warranted, prosecuted.”</p> message 59345710 British PM vows support for UK Jews as anti-Semitism soars CST says it has recorded 106 anti-Semitic incidents since May 8 compared to just 19 in 11 days prior; pro-Palestinian protestors seen harassing Jews, including man who told Jewish kids he would beat them if they did not voice support for Palestine Reuters https://www.ynetnews.com/article/BJHMSFzYO Wed, 19 May 2021 17:38:17 +03:00 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday the government would support the local Jewish community in any way it could after a spike in anti-Semitic incidents, including an attack on a rabbi, following the outbreak of hostilities in Gaza. The Community Security Trust (CST), which advises Britain's estimated 280,000 Jews on security matters, said it had recorded 106 anti-Semitic incidents since May 8 compared to 19 in the 11 previous days, a fivefold increase. Responding to a question in parliament from Keir Starmer, leader of the opposition Labour Party, Johnson said: "I share his horror at the outbreak of anti-Semitic incidents and the government has conveyed that message loud and clear to those who are responsible for enforcing the law against hate crime." "As a country and as a society... we call this out at every stage. We will not let it take root, we will not allow it to grow and fester." In one high-profile incident, a video posted on social media on Sunday showed a convoy of cars bearing Palestinian flags driving through a Jewish community in north London and broadcasting anti-Semitic messages and calls for the rape of Jewish women from a megaphone. Phave since arrested four men on suspicion of racially aggravated public order offenses and they were later released on police bail pending further investigation. Assault, threats Police have also arrested two men for a religiously aggravated assault on a rabbi in Chigwell, to the north of London. He needed hospital treatment for concussion after receiving a number of blows to the head. The CST said there had been several incidents of individuals shouting "Free Palestine" at random Jewish people, daubing graffiti next door to a synagogue and emailing abuse to Jewish community leaders. In another case, a man stopped Jewish schoolchildren in London and threatened to punch them if they did not say they supported Palestine. "There is a particular problem of cars, either individually or in convoysorder offenses and they were later released on police bail pending further investigation.</p> <h3 class = "pHeader">Assault, threats </h3> <p>Police have also arrested two men for a religiously aggravated assault on a rabbi in Chigwell, to the north of London. He needed hospital treatment for concussion after receiving a number of blows to the head.</p> <p>The CST said there had been several incidents of individuals shouting "Free Palestine" at random Jewish people, daubing graffiti next door to a synagogue and emailing abuse to Jewish community leaders.</p> <p>In another case, a man stopped Jewish schoolchildren in London and threatened to punch them if they did not say they supported Palestine.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement18363573> <p>"There is a particular problem of cars, either individually or in convoys, driving through Jewish neighborhoods, waving Palestinian flags and shouting slogans in a way that is clearly intended to intimidate local Jewish communities," the CST said.</p> <p>"The level of anger and hate that is directed at Israel always spills over into anti-Semitism at times like this and yet the people stoking this anger, online and on the streets, never take responsibility for this particular consequence."</p> <p>Israel said on Wednesday it was not setting a timeframe for an end to hostilities with Gaza as its military pounded the Palestinian enclave with airstrikes and Hamas militants unleashed new cross-border rocket attacks.</p> <p><br></p> message 59343860 Israel accuses Chinese state TV of ‘blatant anti-Semitism’ Outrage from Israel's Embassy in China comes after state broadcaster CCTV host told audiences, speaking English, that 'Jews dominate finance, internet sectors' and have powerful lobbies in the U.S., warranting support for Israel Associated Press https://www.ynetnews.com/article/rJHVqUfFu Wed, 19 May 2021 13:2:28 +03:00 Israel's Embassy in China is protesting what it describes as "blatant anti-Semitism" on a program ran by the overseas channel of state broadcaster CCTV discussing the ongoing violence in Gaza and elsewhere. In a tweet, the embassy said "we have hoped that the times of the 'Jews controlling the world' conspiracy theories were over, unfortunately anti-Semitism has shown its ugly face again." "We are appalled to see blatant anti-Semitism expressed in an official Chinese media outlet," the tweet said. Calls to the embassy were answered with a message saying it was closed on Wednesday and it wasn't immediately clear what it objected to in the three-minute segment. On the Tuesday CGTN broadcast, host Zheng Junfeng questioned whether U.S. support for Israel was truly based on shared democratic values, saying "some people believe that U.S. pro-Israeli policy is traceable to the influence of wealthy Jews in the U.S. and the Jewish lobby on U.S. foreign policy makers." "Jews dominate finance and internet sectors," Zheng says, speaking in English. "So do they have the powerful lobbies some say? Possible." Zheng then accused the U.S. "China's top geopolitical rival" of using Israel as a "beachhead" in the Middle East and a as proxy in its campaign to defeat pan-Arabism. Spokesperson Erez Katz Volovelsky said Wednesday the embassy had nothing to add to its tweet and had so far received no reply from CGTN, which CCTV operates for foreign audiences, similar to Russia's RT. China has long been a strong backer of the Palestinian cause and in recent days, the Foreign Ministry has castigated the U.S. for blocking a statement in the United Nations Security Council condemning the violence. Yet, since establishing formal diplomatic relations with Israel in 1992, Beijing has nurtured close economic, technological and military ties, including the purchase of early model Israeli drones. Judaism is not one of China's officially recognized religions, however, and stereotypes about Jews aar received no reply from CGTN, which CCTV operates for foreign audiences, similar to Russia's RT.</p> <IMG id=captionImageElement19119218> <p>China has long been a strong backer of the Palestinian cause and in recent days, the Foreign Ministry has castigated the U.S. for blocking a statement in the United Nations Security Council condemning the violence.</p> <p>Yet, since establishing formal diplomatic relations with Israel in 1992, Beijing has nurtured close economic, technological and military ties, including the purchase of early model Israeli drones.</p> <p>Judaism is not one of China's officially recognized religions, however, and stereotypes about Jews as shrewd businesspeople and market manipulators are common among the Chinese public.</p> <p><br></p> message 59328560 4 arrested for anti-Semitic rape threats in Jewish area of London Convoy adorned with Palestinian flags drives through North London to shouts of 'F**k the Jews,' 'Rape their daughters' and 'Free Palestine'; British PM says he stands with 'Britain's Jews who should not have to endure this type of shameful racism' Associated Press, Ynet https://www.ynetnews.com/article/HkBOw0Au00 Sun, 16 May 2021 22:40:33 +03:00 The Metropolitan Police in London on Sunday arrested four people after drivers in a convoy of cars carrying Palestinian flags made calls to rape Jewish women. The convoy was driving down a road in North London, which has a sizeable Jewish community, when the calls were made. The four men were arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated public order offences and were taken into custody at a west London police station, according to the police statement. The Community Security Trust, a charity that monitors the security of the Jewish community, said the convoy had travelled from Bradford in northern England. "We are aware of a video appearing to show anti-Semitic language being shouted from a convoy of cars in the St John's Wood area this afternoon," the Metropolitan Police wrote on Twitter before the arrests. "Officers are carrying out urgent enquiries to identify those responsible. This sort of behaviour will not be tolerated." Prime Minister Boris Johnson, London Mayor Sadiq Khan and Labour Party leader Keir Starmer all condemned the incident, which came just before the Jewish festival of Shavuot. "There is no place for antisemitism in our society," Johnson wrote on Twitter. "Ahead of Shavuot, I stand with Britain's Jews who should not have to endure the type of shameful racism we have seen today," the prime minister said. The incident sparked fear among members of the British Jewish community, some of whom said they were now afraid to walk through the city. "I guess after today I have to add to this thread "don't shout 'F*ck the Jews' while driving through north London," British Jewish writer Dave Rich, who has written extensively about anti-Semitism in the UK, said on Twitter on Sunday. Also Sunday, a London rabbi was attacked close to his synagogue in Chigwell, Essex. The British media reported that Rabbi Rafi Goodwin was hospitalized with head and eye injuries after he was attacked by two men. The Labour Party leader of the local council, Je type of shameful racism we have seen today," the prime minister said.&nbsp;</p> <p>The incident sparked fear among members of the British Jewish community, some of whom said they were now afraid to walk through the city.&nbsp;</p> <p>"I guess after today I have to add to this thread "don't shout 'F*ck the Jews' while driving through north London," British Jewish writer Dave Rich, who has written extensively about anti-Semitism in the UK, said on Twitter on Sunday. &nbsp;</p> <DIV id=tvElement5704693></DIV><BR><p>Also Sunday, a London rabbi was attacked close to his synagogue in Chigwell, Essex.&nbsp;</p> <p>The British media reported that Rabbi Rafi Goodwin was hospitalized with head and eye injuries after he was attacked by two men.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Labour Party leader of the local council, Jas Athwal, said that Essex police were treating the attack as an anti-Semitic hate crime, but said it did not appear to be related to what he called "heightened tensions in the Middle East."&nbsp;</p> <p>"Antisemitism has no place in our society," Athwal said. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>There has been rise in anti-Jewish sentiment in the British capital since the start of the fighting in Gaza last week. &nbsp;</p> <p>On Saturday, thousands of demonstrators gathered outside the Israeli Embassy in London to protest Israel's operation in Gaza. Some protesters set fire to and tore up Israeli flags. &nbsp;</p> <p><br></p> message